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20120930
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
the united states government and egyptian government are friends, not enemies? >> ( translated ): we are not enemies, of course. >> rose: you're our friends? >> ( translated ): for sure we are friends. >> rose: allies? >> the u.s. president said otherwise. >> rose: i know he did. but i'm asking the egyptian president. do you consider the united states an ally? >> ( translated ): this is depending on the definition of an ally. we have a real partnership in the interest and we want to achieve the interest of the world and to participate in many issues-- diplomatic, political, economical-- exchange of expertise in several areas. so the understanding of an ally as a part of a military alliance this is not existing right now. but if you mean by ally, partner and special diplomatic relationship and cooperation we are that ally. >> rose: president morsi for the hour. next. >> tonight a special edition of charlie rose. >> rose: mohamed morsi won an historic election this june to become the fifth president of egypt. he is the first civilian to hold this title. two years ago it would have been
president of the united states bill clinton in conversation with me and my colleague at cbs nora o'donnell. >> rose: do you think this election the president has said that change has to come from outside rather than in washington, that this election has the possibility of producing a change that will be able to overcome gridlock. >> i don't think it to the only has the possibility, i think it almost certainly will. and let me explain why. i think the president's going to w but let's assume governor romney won. if he wins, that almost certainly means the republicans will hold on to the house and it will be about 50/50 in the senate, more or less the way it is now. you can't filibuster a budget. it's the only thing that doesn't require 60 votes in the senate to pass o as opposed to 51. so a lot of the policymaking will be pushed into the budget and he'll just have to pick up one or two people on that. if you assume that he is going to do what he said he's going to do, i think a lot of his priorities will be enacted. and i think it will be bad on the budget side, as i said. including
of saudi intelligence, ambassador to the united states and other countries >> a throughou these 80 some years that we have had our kingdom, everybody keeps talking about an uncertain future for the kingdom and because of the sagacity of the people of saudi arabia and the good will of the leadership and the government we have survived pretty well so far we have many problems to face, including syria. many challenges internal among the ung pele and how the go about the courses of development not just economically but socially and politically and the role of women, etc. all of these are tremendous challenges that are being debated within the kingdom and not coming from the outside. >> rose: tom friedman and prince turki al-faisal when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tom friedman is here, he is a pulitzer prize winning columnist in for the "new york times." for more than 30 years he's been writing ant foreign affairs, american politics and so much more. in addition to serving as bureau chief in beirut
to the united states. >> i think the componts, the resolution of the iranian crisis there has to be negotiation, there has to be sanctions, there has to be a credible threat of war and there has to be a ladder to enable the regime to climb down. if you have all four elements in play then you can have a peaceful resolution to all of these. but if you look at it, i'm not happy, i should say this very clearly. i'm not happy with the way our foreign policy and doe midwest i can politics have become intertwined. i'm not happy at the rift between the prime minister and the administration. when he said we need to see red lines, secretary clinton said there are not going to be red lines. >> rose: we conclude with best selling author michael lewis talking about a new article he has in "vanity fair" about president obama. >> i thought what would be a fun piece of journalism to do? and i just had been struck through the course not just of this man's administration, this president's administration but previous ones just kind of a dysjuncture between the commentary on the outside and what it kind of seemed
against the united states without some consequencesment now that authority has been removed. the imams and other speakers at fridayrayers are fee to s almt whatever they want. and that makes the situation far more dangerous. >> protests and deaths in the middle east. and political implications in america when we continue. >> funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. in this presidential election of 2012 foreign policy was not considered to be an important ctor. that all chandnow because on monday night when american diplomatic interests came under attack in egypt and libya, tragically ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed in benghazi, governor romney has attempted to make some political attacks out of the situation. and here is what he said. >> i think it's a-- a -- -- a terrible course for america to stand in apology for our values. >> rose: president obama responded in kind in a conversation
and savage group, not the people or government of libya. >> warner: the president said the united states woulwork with the libyan government to track down the perpetrators. >> today, we mourn four more americans who represent the very best of the united states of america. we will not waver in our commitment to see that justice is done for this terrible act. and make no mistake, justice will be done. >> warner: for now, the pentagon ordered special units of marines to libya called "fast" teams, like this detachment shown training, to reinforce security at diplomatic sites in libya. and from tripoli, the president of libya's national assembly echoed the words of his american counterparts. >> ( translated ): we apologize to the united states of america and to the american people and to the whole world for what happened, and at the same time we expect the rest of the world to help us face these cowardly criminal acts. we refuse to use our country's land as a scene of cowardly reprisals. >> warner: those reprisals came apparently in response to internet clips of a film titled "the innocence o
, for responding to this video with violence. >> woodruff: clinton also sought again to distance the united states' government from the film and its maker. the associated press reported that he's been identified as a coptic christian living in california with a checkered legal past. actors in the film said that they were duped, that the blasphemous and offensive dialogue was later dubbed in. and not just muslims, but coptic christians in cairo denounced the film and its apparent intent. >> ( translated ): if it is proven that there is a copt that participated in the making of this movie, the church 100% refuses him. >> woodruff: there were efforts to remove the video from view. the government of afghanistan tried to block youtube access. and in egypt and libya, youtube restricted users from playing the clip. meanwhile, american naval and military assets in the mediterranean, including warships and drone aircraft, refocused on lya, a counry they helped liberate last year as part of a u.n.-sanctioned, nato operation. >> woodruff: nancy yousseff of mcclathy newspapers. she has been reporting on the a
further monetary policy to boost the united states economy. after last friday's disappointing labor report there is a growing call for a robust response from the central bank which is the fed, financial markets have rallied with the expectation of a third round of bond buying known as cuan tative easing. but that option is controversial with the election two months away. joining me from washington david leonhardt, washington bureau chief of the "new york times". in 2011 he won a pulitzer prize rhis columns on the u.s. economy. i'm pleased to have him back on this program. >> thank you, charlie. >> rose: so what might the fed do and what consequences might happen? >> well, the fed is now talking about doing a version of something it has already done a couple timesment people may have heard the phrase q e3 to refer to what this is n technical terms that is quantitative easing 3. let's skip the technical terms, in essence it would buy up assets. in the course of buying up assets it would try to reduce long-term interest rate short trem interest rates are already essentily at zero, the fed mov
or police who are serving, who were not part of the taliban but who then turn against the united states? what about that? >> well, that in itself is worrisome. in other words, if the non-taliban afghan security forces are growing anti-american, that means that the line between taliban and afghan security forces can be actually gradually diminishing. also in the eyes of the population, sometimes the way we look at this very clinically that this many are taliban and this many are not may not b apparent to the afghan population who see that the afghan security forces are acting like the way the taliban would act. >> woodruff: this all started, john nagl, about this video, this anti-islam video came out. but is that playing a significant role in what we're now seeing? >> i don't think it's playing a significant role in the attacks we saw over the weekend. it is playing obviously a very significant role in the more broad islamic uprisings against american embassies including in pakistan. i continue to think that pakistan is the root of the problem and the country we should be most concerned
the united states because of the role it played in toppling colonel qaddafi, but also because coy say with every conversation i have had with every libyan here in the last three or four days a sense of shock, dismay and embarrassment over what happened at the killing of th u.s. em was door. and think that has really been wakup cl for many here who, in fact, want to take action now against these militias and armed groups, whether they are able to do it or not is another question. >> brown: are you picking up any more about who was responsible, who's being looked at, who is being discussed over there? >> i mean it is early. most people assume that it's radical jihadist group which is known here and which now some of the militias are going after. but there is really a broader problem here. the problem ishat since the fall of qaddafi the authorities are relying not on their own security forces, becauseheyon't have any they have subcontracted security to militias and armed groups because they need someone to step in. but those very forces are the ones that are fueling the instability and t
condemnation has given a strong message that the united states government not only condemns it, but has absolutely no support for such blasphemous videos or content anywhere. i think that is an important message. i think that should go a long way in ending the violence on many streets in the world. >> brown: but in iran, at a military parade, president mahmoud ahmadinejad accused the u.s. and others of promoting strife under the guise of protecting civil liberties. >> ( translated ): they are seeking to trigger ethnic and religious conflicts. they chant fake slogans of freedom, and claim commitment to freedom of thought and freedom of speech. >> brown: and back in pakistan, prime minister raja pervez ashraf called for the world to outlaw blasphemy. >> we are demanding that the united nations and other international organizations seek a law that bans such hate speech aimed at fomenting hatred and sowing the seeds of discord through such falsehood. >> brown: in the meantime, pakistan shut down youtube access after the web site refused to remove the anti- islamic video. and in france, auth
by the united states. >> fundamentally we do not take seriously the threats of an attack on iran by them even though we are iran. iran at the end of the day is a great country. let me assure you we do have all defensive means at our disposal. >> prime minister netanyahu has said that israel simply cannot stand to have iran to get to the point where it has enough enriched uranium to be able to very quickly convert that to weapons grade and really essentially from a weaon in a matter of months. he's made it clear that israel is prepared to take military action to try to prevent that. do you think he's bluffing? >> you see, whether he's bluffing or he really intends that does not even come into the equation. for us. what are these scientists? put a world map in front of you. put an at last in front of you. iran has been iran for the last 7,000-10,000 years. they have been occupying those territories for the last 60 to 70 years with the support and force of the westerners. they have no roots there in history. >> ifill: i'm joined by margaret warner who is at the u.n. this afternoon. margaret, tha
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)